Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Uses for Leftover Lanolin; Don't Throw It Away!



My daughter took to breastfeeding immediately after birth.  She latched quickly, and it was very easy for us.  Even though she had a wonderful latch, I still dealt with one nursing woe that many of you may be able to relate to: sore nipples.  After two days, my nipples were raw and one was even bleeding.  That was when my mother suggested I get some lanolin to help with the pain.  That little purple tube of lanolin saved me from a lot of pain and made nursing a breeze!  After about two weeks, I wasn’t in any more pain and I had no further use for the lanolin.  Or did I?

A few months later, I started using wool soakers for cloth diapering.  I knew they needed to be lanolized, so I went through my drawers and came across my trusty old tube of lanolin.  It was still almost full!  It got me thinking, “What should I do with my leftover lanolin?”  You may have thought the same thing yourself, and I’m here to tell you, there are lots of uses for it!

Wool.  Cloth diapering moms will probably already know about this one.  Lanolin is taken from wool, so of course it can be of use when you put it back in!  Lanolizing wool soakers is a must, but lanolinzing wool sweaters can also have benefits, such as making your sweaters softer and more weather resistant.

Chap stick.  Nothing has soothed my dry, chapped and peeling lips like lanolin.  It’s easy, it’s simple and it's effective.  I just squeeze a little on my finger (be careful, you don't need much!) and apply directly to my lips.

Lotion.  You can add it to a homemade lotion recipe, or use it alone.  Lanolin is amazing for severely dry skin, cracked heels, and even excema.  It does make your skin feel a little waxy for a while, so if I'm using it on my feet I make sure to put socks on over it.  This is my favorite night-time treatment for cracking heels and dry hands.

Diaper rash.  Lanolin can be used alone or as an addition to DIY rash cream.  The waxy substance will not only moisturize little butts but will also act as a protective barrier against urine and feces, making it a great treatment and preventative.  Lanolin is thought to be cloth diaper safe, but I suggest using a liner with synthetic fabrics.  Make sure to wash your diapers on HOT after using.


Burns.  You can find some relief from minor burns, sunburns and wind burns with lanolin.  Just gently rub a little on the burned area to moisturize the skin and form a protective barrier.

Lanolin has so many uses apart from breastfeeding.  In the beginning, I was just looking to use up what I had left.  I have found so many uses for lanolin that I journeyed down to my local health store and bought a larger tub of it.  So don't throw out that old tube of lanolin yet!  Put it to use, and find another reason to love it.

10 comments:

  1. Ooh. Great ideas! I am going to remember this for burns.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I had no idea lanolin was good for burns!

    ReplyDelete
  3. lanolin is good for EVERYTHING! cuts scrapes burns diaper rash bugbites... if you want a good conditioning lotion add a lump of lanolin to a thinner lotion or salve (i use burtsbees salve sometimes) and mix it well so it spreads thinner

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have used my lanolin for other skin care woes on myself. Definitely great for lips.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Another great skin use I've found is that is helps decrease itching of bug bites. I'm not sure why, but it really helps.

      Delete
  5. My midwife always gives me lots of little trial size Lansinoh packs after delivery. You've given me some great ideas for using them up!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Didn't know about burns. cool.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like to rub it on my toddler's legs in winter when his eczema flares up. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great ideas! I definitely had gotten a huge bottle of it from the hospital that I ended up giving away before I knew about all the awesome uses for it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks! This is exactly what I was looking for. Done with breastfeeding here, and I hate throwing stuff away.

    ReplyDelete